Three Ring Circus: Glutton for Greed

 Board and Card Games, Reviews  Comments Off on Three Ring Circus: Glutton for Greed
Dec 012014
 

My parents’ house doubles as the archiving facility for my childhood toy car collection.  Among the Porsches and Renaults there is a large brown Buick Regal with a man firing a gun from the back seat.  This is Kojak’s car and through the 70s and 80s it policed the living room carpet with sterling assistance from a police Jag.  I never watched an episode of Kojak, because it was on too late at night, but a filtering down of clips and comedy skits, (Telly Savalas was even on Top of the Pops!), meant that I had an idea that it was cool.

Greed

Greed is is a card drafting game that asks you to establish a corner of crime in a sleazy 1970s city.  It is designed by Donald X Vaccarino and plays in 30 minutes with 2 to 5 players.  When I heard about it, my thoughts immediately turned to questionable cars, large lapels, guns and booze: could this be the game that recreates the Kojak universe?

The box.

Contents

Greed is published by Queen Games. Inside a smallish box you will find a stack of cards featuring thugs, locations and actions, money cards and some cardboard dollar chits, (wooden if you went with the Kickstarter).  The dollar markers are a little underwhelming.  They are a bit awkward to pick up and I plan to replace them with something a little more solid, perhaps glass beads.

Show me the money.

Show me the money.

I like the money cards, they fit the style of the game, (more than coins would), and work so much better than paper money.  The other cards are unique and made to look like part of a little black book that you would use to keep a tally of your ‘business’, a personnel file and newspaper clippings.  The portraits of the characters and locations are particularly choice.  They bring out the setting of the game perfectly and justify, to me, the extra mile put in by the manufacturer.

Setup

Getting this game out onto the table couldn’t be easier.  Put out the money and the dollar marks, and deal 12 cards to each player.

Let the greed begin..

Given the name of the game, it is not surprisingly that, the player with the most money, (made up of cash and interests in property), wins.

Let’s start with the simple bit first: You have a hand of 12 cards.  Pick one and pass the rest on to the person on your left. If you explained the game well, everyone else will be doing the same and you should have a deck of 11 cards in front of you.  When this happens for the third time, everyone plays a card to the table and activates it in order, (each card has a unique number).  Play continues like this: draw a card, play a card until the 12 card hands have been used up.

How to play is simple, but any budding gangster knows that making crime pay takes a bit of planning.

There are three types of cards:

  • Actions are one off events triggered when played.
A wide variety of capers are available.

A wide variety of capers are available.

  • Thugs form your gang and are played to the table.  Once in play they may offer resources such as cars, guns and keys, (presumably burglary skills), as well as unique powers.

Thugs

  • Holdings are local businesses that you acquire an interest in. They offer specialisms, (love, booze and hardware), as well as unique abilities.  When a holding is played, markers are added to it for each specialist icon on that property, as well as any matching icons on holdings you already have in play.  As each marker is worth $10,000 trying to corner the market in a particular type can really pay off when it comes to scoring.
Plenty of opportunities to make your mark.

Plenty of opportunities to make your mark.

 

Right from the off you will find yourself skimming through the cards, working out what you want to pick, and what you hope will still be there when the hand comes back around.

A card can be free, have a cost or a need.  A cost could be straight cash, alternatively you could find yourself sacrificing a lesser thug or holding that you have in play to pull a bigger card into the action.  A need means having the required resource to hand, so pulling off a Museum Heist action needs you to have thugs with guns, cars and burglary skills, (but you probably know that and have the swag bag to prove it).

You have to be flexible to make it to the top of the greasy pole.  Winning the game is about seeing the patterns and paths to victory that the cards in your hand and the decks offer.  For example playing “Generous” Jenny Jones gives you money, but she will want it back at the end of the game.  Forget that! You can sacrifice her to bring in Eugene “The Butcher” Midge.  Who you can then use to pull off a string of actions.   With 80 cards to play from, no two games are ever going to be the same, but you will come to recognise cards that work well together.

Jenny may be generous, but that may not help her long term prospects.

Jenny may be generous, but that may not help her long term prospects.

As new cards come into your hand, new opportunities present themselves and your plans shift. Its about opportunism, and a little bit of gambling.    Do this right and you will find yourself playing late game cards that swing the game your way, do it wrong and those last cards can’t be played and will end up discarded.

Playing with Three

Greed is definitely not a game to play with children.  It has the classic crime themes of booze, vice and criminal activity.  Cards with massage parlours and street walkers’ actions do not make for a family game.  Fortunately I was able to pull in my, age appropriate, brother in law and his wife to allow me to properly review this for three players.  As this game has a drafting mechanic, it works well for three as well as two.  Playing with 4 or 5 should be equally fast, unfortunately I have not had the chance to give that a try yet.

How easy is it to teach the game?

The game teaches very easily.  Explaining how marks get placed on holdings needs a demonstration to get the concept across, but not much else.  Most cards play in a straightforward way, but others have a little bit more complexity, like an effect that happens on the next turn, or relies on others playing a certain sort of card.  With Donald X Vaccarino games, I have learnt to take the cards at face value. This means that you can, and should, read the text on the card and do what it says.   Whenever I feel a need to check how a card should work on BoardGameGeek, Mr V is there explaining, “Yes, the card works just like the text says it does.”

Can complexity be scaled?

Like a swan, pulling part of it off wouldn’t make it simpler, just messier and angry.

Can you handicap other players? Do you need to?

As the game plays in 30 minutes it seems unnecessary to handicap.  If you were feeling generous, perhaps you could offer your opponent a starting pile of cash, ($20,000?), as a gift from a godfather.

How likely is your child to flip the table half way through?

Your child won’t be playing this game.  If an adult flipped the table over a 30 minute game, I would probably not ask them to game with me again.

Beyond the game

I appear to have a fair amount of funkalicious music to act as background to playing this game.  If you don’t, I highly recommend Austria’s Superfly.FM who are available online and specialise in a stream of late night groovery.

What do I think?

Greed has been the late night hit of autumn and winter.  After my son has gone to bed, the lights go down, the music goes on and the cards are dealt.

I like so many aspects of the game, the setting and art work is perfect.  It is not complicated to learn, or play. Scoring happens at the end and is quick to do.  The pace is spot on: it picks up as fewer cards are left in the deck and the card choice becomes quicker.  This means that the last few turns are over in no time at all.

It is a petri dish of crime, allowing you to repeat your criminal experiment over and over again, researching the ultimate combination of cards to create an algae bloom of bad cars, guns, booze and lurve.  It’s crazy that a game that last 30 minutes, and allows you to play 10 cards, offers so many decisions and possibilities.

I highly recommend Greed.

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About Neil Robinson

Some say Neil spends too much time thinking about board games. I disagree. What is true, is that I moved to the coldest and wettest part of England, guaranteeing plenty of chances to play games with my family.

Extra Life 24hr Game-a-thon 2014 – Wargaming Recon #126

 Console, Indie Games, PC, Podcast, Table Top, Video Games, Wargaming Recon  Comments Off on Extra Life 24hr Game-a-thon 2014 – Wargaming Recon #126
Nov 242014
 

extra-life-final-tally

Extra Life 24hr Game-a-thon 2014

The Extra Life 24hr Game-a-thon helps kids in need to get the medical treatments they desperately need. Learn how Wargaming Recon raised money by playing games for 24 hours.

The funds are used to provide medical care for kids whose families otherwise could not afford the help.

Listen to this episode to learn more about this great cause, discover some cool new games, and maybe you will be empowered to participate next year!

This episode discussed:

Extra Life 24hr Game-a-thon

Continue reading »

About Jonathan J. Reinhart

Jonathan J. Reinhart is an editor of Troll in the Corner where he writes about wargaming. Jonathan also is the owner of the Wargaming Recon podcast. He has been gaming with miniatures since 2000 and playing board games from a young age. He's played a myriad of games such as: Warhammer 40k, Warhammer Fantasy, Warmachine, Starship Troopers, Axis & Allies: War at Sea, Flames of War and Warlord Games' Black Powder rules. War at Sea and the Black Powder rules are his current go-to games. Jonathan enjoys casual, fast, fun, and group board games. Sitting Ducks Gallery, Zombie Dice, Guillotine, Pandemic, and Carcassonne rank high on his list. He is a retired local politician with a B.A. in Politics & History, which provides a useful background for historical gaming. A casual World of Warcraft player, he became a Kingslayer as Viktrious the Blood Elf on 4/23/11 and followed that up by slaying Deathwing on 5/9/12.

Don’t be a Knee Jerk!

 Board and Card Games, Reviews  Comments Off on Don’t be a Knee Jerk!
Sep 192014
 

I’ve been hosting weekly board gaming nights at my library for about two years now and, at times, it can be difficult to provide an experience for the wide diversity of people who show up. You can get teens, boomers, millennials, hipsters, geeks, and emerging games of all types. In that sort of situation, a good appetizer game is almost pivotal to getting everyone talking and laughing and ready for the main course. With a group of people who come from a diversity of backgrounds and experiences, something to break the ice can be extraordinarily helpful. Generally I break out Cash & Guns since the game is simple but it can be off-putting for those uncomfortable with pointing guns at each other. Masquarade can be a blast! However, the game can really lag when people don’t get into the randomness of it. Skull is another fun one but if you can’t bluff…it becomes rather meaningless.

Basics:

Designer: Andrew Federspiel
Players: 4-8
Game Length: 10 minutes
Ages: 9+
Category: Party Games, Freudian Slips
Mechanic: Storytelling, Reflexes

Knee Jerk by Knapsack Games and currently on Kickstarter (fully funded, btw), fills all your opening game needs perfectly well. Basically a party game, Knee Jerk accommodates 4-8 players and plays in about 10 minutes. In this game, players provide their instant (“Knee Jerk”) reaction to a series of cards set out on the table. The cards tier next to each other like a set of stairs which provide a randomized humorous situation. For example, a set of cards can read a situation “I feel panicked…at the beach…because I saw…” and the group quickly yell out something that would fit the scenario. The first player to provide the best/funniest/quickest ending to the sentence wins the point.

knee jerk

This game sorta has the feel of playing Cards Against Humanity without the vulgar (not that there is anything wrong with it) cards and with less deliberation over which cards to play. Knee Jerk consists of a set of 55 cards so, similar to Pairs by Cheapass Games, this one would probably go in my car’s glove compartment for whenever something quick, fast and easy is needed. However, due the stepping mechanic of the card set-up, it allows for a great amount of variability in such a small amount of cards.

The rules are simple. The host lays down three cards in the step like fashion so the cards interlock and then reads the resulting scenario. The host then announces the scenario and the players quickly start yelling out answers and the host awards a point for the first reply. Rather than attempting the best answer the idea is that the quickest answer will likely be the most ridiculous. But be prepared for some Freudian slips…

Personally, this is more fun when the host alternates throughout the game allowing for a new person to read aloud the scenario and perhaps allowing the players to rely more on their knowledge of the host to provide an answer they would approve of (again, I maybe using this as a replacement for CaH, which I generally appreciate but don’t enjoy playing especially in my library gaming group).

Would You Rather…

Would you rather use Knee Jerk as an opener over other, more established games? Yes. For the simple fact that it requires zero time to explain, plays fast, and breaks the ice, I would use this over other openers such as Skull. Or even as an opener for an opener.

Would you rather play Knee Jerk over CaH? Totally. CaH doesn’t allow for a clean game while Knee Jerk allows for a clean, filthy or just strange game depending on the crowd. It provides for more variety of play.

Would you rather play Knee Jerk over other storytelling games (Gloom, Once upon a Time, Fiasco)? No. But, to be fair these aren’t party games. If I wanted the feel of a storytelling game with a large group of non-gamers, then I’d take Knee Jerk…but if I had four gamers, I’d pull out Gloom. If I wanted pure storytelling, I would not go to Knee Jerk for it.

How about Dixit? HAHA! I gotcha. True. You got me. I’d take Dixit over Knee Jerk but honestly, Dixit requires more creativity to play and if I just feel like tossing out ideas rather than formulating how a card relates to an song lyric, I’d grab Knee Jerk. If I didn’t feel like thinking…like at the end of a night of drinking and gaming, I’d easily throw Knee Jerk on the table over Dixit. So take that, Imaginary Narrative Element.

Bottom-line:

Go check out Knee Jerk over on Kickstarter. It is fully funded and only costs $10 to get the game and all stretch goals. Spread some love people, you will easily get $10 worth of use out of this game.

About John Pappas

I'm John ~ a short, mustachioed Library Director of a small branch library outside of Philly. I'm a father, geek, librarian and zen practitioner. I wear glasses, play board games and tend to read pretty much anything that comes across my desk. I organize and host three gaming groups at my library ~ The Golden Gamers (65+), Tabletop Gaming at the Library, and a Game Design Guild. The name of this column "Roll for Fire" comes from my love of Flash Point: Fire Rescue [ and cooperative games in general] and the desire I have to watch it all burn down.

GE53: 5 Reasons Star Wars Dark Empire Trilogy is AWESOME

 Comics, Geeks Explicitly, Literature, Movies and TV, Podcast, review, Reviews  Comments Off on GE53: 5 Reasons Star Wars Dark Empire Trilogy is AWESOME
Sep 112014
 

Dark-Empire

Star Wars Dark Empire is an intriguing graphic novel that expands on the Holy Trilogy.  Discover 5 reasons you need to read this graphic novel trilogy.

  • 5) It continues the saga with a focus on the future by paying homage to the past
  • 4) It shows the cyclical nature of the Force
  • 3) It shows the realistic impact of destroying the 2nd Death Star.  The story does NOT end there.
  • 2) The Emperor is even more badass this time around.
  • 1) The TECH is incredible!

Continue reading »

About Jonathan J. Reinhart

Jonathan J. Reinhart is an editor of Troll in the Corner where he writes about wargaming. Jonathan also is the owner of the Wargaming Recon podcast. He has been gaming with miniatures since 2000 and playing board games from a young age. He's played a myriad of games such as: Warhammer 40k, Warhammer Fantasy, Warmachine, Starship Troopers, Axis & Allies: War at Sea, Flames of War and Warlord Games' Black Powder rules. War at Sea and the Black Powder rules are his current go-to games. Jonathan enjoys casual, fast, fun, and group board games. Sitting Ducks Gallery, Zombie Dice, Guillotine, Pandemic, and Carcassonne rank high on his list. He is a retired local politician with a B.A. in Politics & History, which provides a useful background for historical gaming. A casual World of Warcraft player, he became a Kingslayer as Viktrious the Blood Elf on 4/23/11 and followed that up by slaying Deathwing on 5/9/12.

GE52: 5 Reasons to Play Star Wars Empire at War

 Geeks Explicitly, PC, Podcast, Technology, Video Games  Comments Off on GE52: 5 Reasons to Play Star Wars Empire at War
Sep 042014
 

SW-Empire-at-War-Hoth

Star Wars Empire at War is a fun real time strategy (RTS) game you can play on computers running Windows or Mac OSX.  Discover 5 reasons you should play the game.

  • 5) It is affordable ($19.99 via Steam or Mac App Store)
  • 4) Captures the RTS feel of Empire vs Rebel Alliance
  • 3) Has a fun campaign mode
  • 2) Inclusion of land-based combat is enjoyable
  • 1) It is fun

Continue reading »

About Jonathan J. Reinhart

Jonathan J. Reinhart is an editor of Troll in the Corner where he writes about wargaming. Jonathan also is the owner of the Wargaming Recon podcast. He has been gaming with miniatures since 2000 and playing board games from a young age. He's played a myriad of games such as: Warhammer 40k, Warhammer Fantasy, Warmachine, Starship Troopers, Axis & Allies: War at Sea, Flames of War and Warlord Games' Black Powder rules. War at Sea and the Black Powder rules are his current go-to games. Jonathan enjoys casual, fast, fun, and group board games. Sitting Ducks Gallery, Zombie Dice, Guillotine, Pandemic, and Carcassonne rank high on his list. He is a retired local politician with a B.A. in Politics & History, which provides a useful background for historical gaming. A casual World of Warcraft player, he became a Kingslayer as Viktrious the Blood Elf on 4/23/11 and followed that up by slaying Deathwing on 5/9/12.

Three Ring Circus: Moor or Less

 Board and Card Games, Reviews  Comments Off on Three Ring Circus: Moor or Less
Aug 252014
 

Growing up in East Yorkshire in the 1970s there were certain things I held to be true: trousers were flared, Hull City were poor, Granada was a TV company in Manchester and the Alhambra was a theatre in Bradford.  Dear reader, imagine my surprise when I discovered that I was wrong: the Alhambra is actually a Moorish palace in Granada,Spain, Hull City are a successful football team and, um well, I still wear flares, (they hide my oversized ankles) *

Being a lover of all things Spanish, I have started on a journey to discover board games with an Iberian theme.  My first stop: Alhambra, produced by Queen Games and designed by Dirk Henn.

Alhambra

Alhambra challenges 2-6 players to build the most successful palace in a shade under an hour.  How is success measured?  Well, this is a Euro game, so there is a scoring track.  Scores are awarded based on who has the most tiles of various types over three, (increasingly more valuable), scoring rounds.  Points are also awarded for the length of your palace walls.  The highest score wins.

P1020673

Contents

Queen Games produce a couple of different versions of Alhambra.  This review is based on the basic set.  A big box edition is available, which comes with a bigger board and some expansions thrown in.  The game comes with 60 tiles for building your Alhambra, a score-board, a market place board, some wooden scoring tokens, a thick wad of card money and a natty draw-string bag to pull the tiles from.  All the components are top quality.

Setup

Setup couldn’t be easier:

  • Pick out the fountain tiles that will form the core of your palace.
  • Put all the tiles in the bag.
  • Deal out money to a value just exceeding 20 to each player.
  • Place the two scoring cards into the remaining pile of money.
  • Lay four tiles on the market board.
  • Lay four money cards out.
  • Vamos a jugar!

P1020666

Play

There are six types of tiles, blue (pavilions), red (seraglios), brown (arcades), green (gardens), white (chambers), and purple (towers).  In scoring, the tiles are worth more ranging from blue to purple.

Money comes in four colours, (orange, blue, yellow and green), ranging in value from 1 to 9.  These colours represent different currencies which can be used to buy tiles.

There are four spots on the market place, representing builders from around the Mediterranean and Europe that will help build your palace.  For the purposes of the game, they have to be paid in their own currency.  Each building tile has a value on it, but the currency paid depends upon which market spot it is placed.  This means that a Gardens tile on the Orange spot can only be bought with orange money (Ducats).

At the start of each turn, you have three options:

  • Buy a tile and add it to your palace.
  • Take some money.
  • Remodel your palace.

Play continues around the table, tiles and money are refreshed as required at the end of a turn until the first scoring card pops up in the money deck, then the second scoring card.  When the tile bag is empty and the market cannot be filled, the remaining tiles are auctioned to the highest bidder and final scoring takes place.

So far so good, but I’ve missed some stuff out:

Exact change:- You can overpay for a tile, but if you pay the right money you get another go.

Money:-You can pick up one card, of any value, or as many as you like if they total 5 or less.

Walls:-Most of the tiles have walls on one or more sides.  Linking the walls can push you to the winner’s enclosure.

P1020665

Planning regulations:- As a vizier you are picky with your palace.  You want to be able to visit your whole palace by walking from the fountain, this means no walking on empty spaces or climbing over walls.  Also those walls?  Building regulations dictate that where tiles touch they must be ‘wall to wall’ or have no walls.

These four tweaks are like whisky in your porridge: flavour and danger lurk beneath the surface.  They turn what should be a nice game about building a nice palace into a brain-burner.  A game where you will discover a pressing need to crush the hopes of your fellow players.

How does this happen?  Lets assume a basic winning plan: place one more tile of each colour than anyone else.  That’s not going to happen, but working out which colours to back and which to drop is key to maximising points.  So you’ll be keeping a close eye on what everyone else has bought, as well as what is in the market and working out how many gardens are left to come out.  While you are at it, why not watch what colour cash people are buying?  Or sneak a peek at the shape of their palace?  The shape of their walls could hint at the next tile they want.

This will lead you to your next decision tree: when do I pick up money, what money do I pick up, or do I overpay to snag a vital tile?  Exact money is great, buy a tile and get another go.  Pay with exact change and you could buy another tile, or fill your coffers with more cash for the next corporate raid.  So, decisions, decisions – do you pick up cash to buy for the right money and risk losing a tile, when one colour is tight, do you pick it up just to spite the others?  Also it’s not just about the colour, it’s about the walls.   You need to put your palace together in a progressive way to encourage further growth.  Tiles that don’t fit can be bought to stymie your opponents, but if you can’t place them in the palace, they don’t go towards your majority.  That’s fine, you might be able to squeeze them in later, or swap them in to your tactical advantage.

Playing with Three

Alhambra plays up to 6.  Playing with three is just great.  Turns come around quickly and with a good chance that the tiles you were after are still on the board.  Playing with 2 uses a dummy player and I usually shy away from that sort of thing, but here it works rather well.  The dummy player gets a fistful of tiles at three points in the game and you can buy tiles for them to mess with your opponent.

How easy is it to teach the game?

The rules are well laid out and pretty straight forward.  A couple of trial rounds and and building an example palace should cement the deal.  The need to place walls against walls, (and open sides against open sides), can be initially confusing, but it is well covered in the instructions as is remodelling.

Can complexity be scaled?

The game doesn’t feel like it needs to have its complexity drip fed.    More complexity comes with the expansions.

Can you handicap other players? Do you need to?

I’m experimenting with an extra turn at the beginning for my son.  At 11 he understands the rules, but is struggling to work out how to win.  We have an understanding in games that he can call in a strategy consultant, (mum or dad), for advice.

How likely is your child to flip the table half way through?

In my case, there is an increasing chance of child flippage.  Playing without handicapping has left him placing third in most games, to his growing frustration.

Beyond the game

We researched the Alhambra and the Lion Fountain.  We have started our collection of Spanish themed games, our next purchase is El Grande. I have also spotted a tile laying game called Don Quixote.

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What do I think?

Let me start by saying that Alhambra is a game that hits a lot of my sweet spots.  It is fairly simple game, it plays in under an hour and, most importantly, there are tiles that can be laid. In fact the first time I played, I had sense of deja vu such was its resonance with me. What more can anyone want?

I’m a huge fan of games that let you build something.  Coming out of a game with a graphic representation of your efforts is a reward in itself, win or lose.  Alhambra gives you that, along with demanding you process a chunk of information in order to play and win.

I do have a couple of minor criticisms.  The black marker pen lines that represent the walls are ugly.  I can see that there is a need to make them clear so that they can be seen from across the table, but I think they could have been done better.  Something that looked like a wall and in keeping with the art style would have been nice.  I also think that each tile could have been individually drawn, it would make no difference to the game, but it would make each palace unique

In conclusion, I highly recommend Alhambra as a family game.  Just remember not to crush the dreams of your opponents too much, or they may not want to play with you.

*Actually, my ankles are of fairly normal proportions.

 

About Neil Robinson

Some say Neil spends too much time thinking about board games. I disagree. What is true, is that I moved to the coldest and wettest part of England, guaranteeing plenty of chances to play games with my family.

GE47: Game Dev Tycoon

 Geeks Explicitly, Indie Games, PC, Podcast, Technology, Video Games  Comments Off on GE47: Game Dev Tycoon
Jul 102014
 

Game-Dev-Tycoon-Screenshot

Game Dev Tycoon ($9.99 on Steam) puts you in control of your very own video game company.  Build it up from your parents’ garage into a multi-million dollar corporation behind hit games.  YOU have the power.

Continue reading »

About Jonathan J. Reinhart

Jonathan J. Reinhart is an editor of Troll in the Corner where he writes about wargaming. Jonathan also is the owner of the Wargaming Recon podcast. He has been gaming with miniatures since 2000 and playing board games from a young age. He's played a myriad of games such as: Warhammer 40k, Warhammer Fantasy, Warmachine, Starship Troopers, Axis & Allies: War at Sea, Flames of War and Warlord Games' Black Powder rules. War at Sea and the Black Powder rules are his current go-to games. Jonathan enjoys casual, fast, fun, and group board games. Sitting Ducks Gallery, Zombie Dice, Guillotine, Pandemic, and Carcassonne rank high on his list. He is a retired local politician with a B.A. in Politics & History, which provides a useful background for historical gaming. A casual World of Warcraft player, he became a Kingslayer as Viktrious the Blood Elf on 4/23/11 and followed that up by slaying Deathwing on 5/9/12.

Great Wargamer Destinations – Wargaming Recon #117

 Podcast, review, Reviews, Table Top, Wargaming Recon  Comments Off on Great Wargamer Destinations – Wargaming Recon #117
Jul 092014
 

Yorktown battlefield sign

Great Wargamer Destinations

Summer is a time to relax and go on vacation. Why not also gather some inspiration for wargaming to boot?

Jonathan shares a few of his favorite wargamer destinations. If we didn’t cover one of your’s, then please share it with us on Facebook, Twitter, or via e-mail at cwfgamecast@wargamingforums.com.

Scale Military Modeller International
The June 2014 issue is briefly, very briefly, reviewed. It is worth picking up if you can. The cost is 4.25 GBP. Visit Scale Military Modeller International for more information.

Continue reading »

About Jonathan J. Reinhart

Jonathan J. Reinhart is an editor of Troll in the Corner where he writes about wargaming. Jonathan also is the owner of the Wargaming Recon podcast. He has been gaming with miniatures since 2000 and playing board games from a young age. He's played a myriad of games such as: Warhammer 40k, Warhammer Fantasy, Warmachine, Starship Troopers, Axis & Allies: War at Sea, Flames of War and Warlord Games' Black Powder rules. War at Sea and the Black Powder rules are his current go-to games. Jonathan enjoys casual, fast, fun, and group board games. Sitting Ducks Gallery, Zombie Dice, Guillotine, Pandemic, and Carcassonne rank high on his list. He is a retired local politician with a B.A. in Politics & History, which provides a useful background for historical gaming. A casual World of Warcraft player, he became a Kingslayer as Viktrious the Blood Elf on 4/23/11 and followed that up by slaying Deathwing on 5/9/12.