Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

Sep 132011
 

Every time I go to a Con there’s one thing I want to do more than anything else, I really want to experience some role playing games that I’ve never played before.  It’s a top priority.  Pax is such a large con and so video game oriented that I struggled to find RPG groups ready to roll out an adventure, but I did happen to fjord through an ocean of board games and get to a few good RPGs.

When I did find great tabletop gaming, it was in one place…

The Indie Games Room

In my time between panels and queuing up for other things I tried to hit the Indie Games room as much as possible, if only to just look at the books they had on the table for browsing.  Of all the tabletop areas, this was the most inviting room.  With someone cheery and eager to help explain the setup and what games will be available and when as soon as I walked in each time, they really did a great job of making me want to play there.  It’s nice, as a gamer, to get that sort of welcome.  Particularly from other gamers, since we have an unfortunate tendency to close ourselves off and stick to our cliques.  Game Masters, many of which were designers of their own games and featured on the GMing panel I first went to, were running games on every even numbered hour throughout the weekend, giving two hour demos that told some surprisingly complete stories.  I only managed to play two game in this room, but I was very pleased with both.

Mouseguard Boxed Set

Based on the on the comic series of the same name and a variation of the Burning Wheel system, Mouseguard is a role playing game that captures the low-fantasy world of a medieval society of anthropomorphic mice.  I’ve heard a lot of criticism of the system, particularly in regard to the Player phase of the game, which admittedly we didn’t test, but I had a great time with the conflict resolution system in it’s odd sort of “Rock, Paper, Scissors” way.  Our Game Master did a great job of letting us state our goals and then had us narratively justify each action type in how it moves us toward that goal, then we used the game’s pretty simple system of opposed dice rolls (where applicable) and he described the action.  The end result of this sort of attempt/description interaction allows for some great conflict sequences, whether they be against environmental or combatant challenges, and makes for a very cinematic visualization of the scene.  Immediately after the game I discussed it with my friends and girlfriend, each of us expressed a desire to play again, and soon.  My only struggle was whether or not to purchase the boxed set, which I did ultimately go ahead and order.  The box comes with the original Mouseguard RPG book, a supplement, action cards for players and Game Master, specially marked dice, a map of the lands the Guard Mice protect, and lastly something I find to just sort of be out of place, a few brightly colored, plastic chesspiece style mouse tokens for tracking map movements.  The tokens did feature in the first Mouseguard book, Fall 1152, but looked much more naturally colored as if with dull dyes on clay as opposed to what I can only describe as “Fisher Price” style vibrancy in the box.  It just jarred with the rest of the character of the game, and I found them a little disappointing.  I have some plans to maybe repaint or at least do a wash on the pieces to make them look just a bit grittier.

Polaris

The other game I was lucky enough to spend a few hours playing gave me an entirely new perspective on role playing.  Far more a structured system of improvisation than traditional games, Polaris is designed for four players, each of which takes turns rotating through roles as both their own individual character, bit part NPCs, and antagonist to another player.  Each rotation of these responsibilities brings with it a change of scene, which may pick up from mere moments after the previous scene or years later depending on the storytelling.  Players have a conversational barter system, bolstered by abilities on their sheet, and conflicts of stats can be brought down to a single die roll.  The system supports role play and combat almost entirely via shared by tale-telling and blocking “phrases”.  I was absolutely amazed with how much story, and the level of depth we explored in our characters, in only two hours of play.  Ben Lehman, the game’s writer, facilitated the game for the four of us, but it took no time to learn and roll with, and he was mostly there so the group didn’t have to read through his rule booklet to know how to play.  I picked up a copy and can’t wait to gather some of my other Game Master friends to run this.  I’m a bit ashamed to admit that I sometimes exclude those folks from games because there tends to be an undertone of tension, that silent power struggle or a “that’s not how I’d do it but…” comment that can come from a GM-player, that is to say someone who is accustomed more to being an GM than a player, but this is the perfect game to remedy that problem.

Other Games

I think with a convention the size of Pax and with so much to do at all times sort of hinders the ability to sit down and play a full session.  I got in a few other games during the con that averaged about an hour, including the Dungeon Delves run by Wizards of the Coast.  I looked in on some short Pathfinder Society games, and got in someone’s homebrew airship battle system to be implemented with their 3.5 campaign, but all of these things were more or less demos rather than full sessions with limited to no role play.  I even participated in the Wizards of the Coast booth Live-Action Role Playing experience, which consisted of no role play and about 2 dice rolls per person, granted it was more of an attention grabbing gimmick than anything, but I was hoping for something more somehow.  With panel lines filling up two hours before hand for some of the major guests, and the huge sprawl of the gaming area, I just don’t think Pax is a good home for tabletop role playing necessarily, but that isn’t to say I didn’t have a great trip as a Role Player between other nerdly interests and even the tabletop oriented panels I wrote about last week.

As a conclusion to my awesome trip (in spite of what it may seem based on that previous paragraph) I’ve decided to host my gallery o’ Pax pictures over on the Game Hermit Facebook page.  Pop over, give a “Like”, and take a look.

Piranha Plant Cosplay

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

 Posted by on September 13, 2011
Sep 052011
 

Little more than a week ago, 70,000 eager gamers descended on Seattle for Pax Prime.  In a dizzying rush they climbed several stories (well, rode the escalator) to the convention’s main expo floor to play test hundreds of popular PC and console games.  And though I took my initial peek into the busy hall filled with vendors displaying their latest and greatest, I set about an immediate mission to scout the tabletop gaming areas, hoping to try out some new stuff and really sink my teeth into a weekend of role playing.  Once I had a good note of where everything was, it was off to get in line for my first panel, and I learned that lines were just something I’d have to get used to at Pax (though I’m not sure I ever did).  The following is a list of panels and the like that I attended which were specifically tabletop role playing related.

Chessex Dice

The Art of the Table:  GMing Beyond the Basics

After about an hour or so in line, probably the shortest wait I’d have during the whole convention, I kicked off my Pax experience with an excellent panel on game mastering.  Sage LaTorra of the recently released Dungeon World RPG joined Apocalypse World creator Vincent Baker as well as Polaris author Ben Lehman.  Rounding out the group were Jeff Fasenfast of GoDaddy and moderator Ben Mandall, who did an excellent job keeping the conversation moving and entertaining.  The panel offered several perspectives and some great advice to use behind the screen, most of which boiled down to the following:  know your players and communicate with them.  No advice can be better than that, and yet it is often what is missed by so many game masters.   If I had to pick one secondary piece of advice, it would be this quote:

“Maybe what your game needs, is child endangerment.” - Vincent Baker

What Vincent was speaking to actually goes in hand directly with the previous statement.  As GMs we need to know what our players want, we need to know what they are comfortable with, and sometimes we need to know what makes them a little uneasy, to push them to new greater heights.  Perhaps putting children’s lives in danger isn’t quite right for your table, that’s not really what Vincent meant, but if your table is mature enough to handle that sort of content even though it might be outside of their comfort zone, it could make for quite the heroic scene to save those kids, or quite the emotional moment if they don’t make it.

Acquisitions Inc:  The Last Will and Testament of James Darkmagic I

More of a show than a panel, this was something I knew I had to see.  Timing being what it was, I was forced to skip over the the Ask the Dungeon Master panel offering more tips and tricks on running a great game, to instead wait in line a few hours dancing with nervous anticipation (or maybe that was just because I needed to go to the bathroom) getting ready for the live game run by Wizards of the Coast Dungeon Master extraordinaire Chris Perkins for an all-star team comprised of Star Trek and The Guild‘s Wil Wheaton, PVP Online author/artist Scott Kurtz, and the Penny Arcade boys themselves, Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik.  In the most over-produced game of D&D ever, the minstrels Paul and Storm played an opening homage not just to Acquisitions Incorporated (the name of the collected group above), but to adult tabletop gamers everywhere.  The adventurers arrived with grand announcements, stage lighting, and smoke machines, dressed in full costume… well, mostly… and ready to roll.  I could go on telling you how much I enjoyed this latest foray into live gaming, or how clever the writing was, or how impressed I was that they fit such a story into 2 hours of play, or I could just link this unofficial video I found via the /r/rpg subreddit.  Be sure to skip ahead to 3:30 seconds for when the intro song and game play begin, then catch part two which is in the playlist below the video.

Watching this game was one of the most incredibly fun experiences of the convention.  I’ve watched the whole thing over again since coming home from my trip, picking up on a few jokes that the crowd’s laughter overpowered and I missed the first time through.  I can’t believe that there isn’t a television show putting celebrities into a role playing game like this, or at least a more frequent web series.  I was a little disappointed that Perkins wasted a lot of time at the beginning of the night with “dragon mounting” rolls, leaving combat to not more than a few rounds, but I understand that this was a story driven, presentation experience and that honestly, the combats didn’t really matter.  I implore you to take the time to enjoy it, the last line by the Dungeon Master still makes me grin.

D&D Through the Ages

An expert team was pooled together for this panel which included creative minds such as Mike Mearls, one of the members of the team responsible for much of 4th Edition Dungeons and Dragons, also Mike Selinker, who did the same for the transition to 3rd Edition, and Keith Baker, creator of the Eberron Campaign Setting for D&D 3.5 and 4th Edition.  The panelists discussed the history of changes from edition to edition, and the trend of modern rules lite games and recreations/rules hacks of older editions.  The discussion was rife with stories from the round table discussions at Wizards during the last two edition changes, and it was great to hear some of the first hand accounts of how certain decisions were made.  The best story had to be Mike Selinker’s with regard to the Open Game License, how that concept was borrowed from open source software programming, and how nervous the designers were to agree to the idea knowing that it could easily make or destroy their ownership of Dungeons and Dragons.

I will also say I was impressed with the candid nature of the panel’s responses with regard to comparisons of 4th Edition and Massive Multiplayer Online games (MMOs), or even comparisons of 3rd Edition to Collectible Card Games (CCGs) such as Magic the Gathering.  There was an air of honesty in the given responses, openly stating to the audience that of course those games played an influential role in the development of the relevant versions of the game.  The way it was stated, Wizards wasn’t so much looking for piggybacking the existing fanbases for CCGs or MMOs (although they did admit some level of that), but instead they were looking for new ways to handle game mechanics that simply didn’t exist at the time previous editions were created.   I enjoyed the fact that nobody tried to dodge any questions or deflect, and I gained a new level of respect for Mike Mearls for how he and the others handled the crowd.

Next Week!

Although I didn’t play too many games during the con (to my surprise), I did have a chance to try out a couple of games that were new to me and to dive head first into a D&D 4e Dungeon Delve and the Wizards of the Coast booth’s live action D&D experience.  Also, be on the look out for my picture gallery, I only had a crappy cell phone camera with me this trip, but I came away with a few cool shots to check out, here’s a few samples…

Piranha Plant Cosplay

 

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

 Posted by on September 5, 2011
Jun 282011
 

This week I finally get around to a long overdue Play Review, the team-based, zombie apocalypse board game, Posthumous Z.

This is a Cow is an independent games developer fully run by Nathan Little, with great assistance from his father.  I was lucky enough to meet both of these gentlemen promoting their game at a local convention and to come away with a copy of the game.  Although it certainly isn’t necessary to appreciate this review,  I recorded an interview with Nathan which you can check out by clicking here before reading my thoughts below which come after having played the game.

First Bites

Opening the box for Posthumous Z a few things stand out worth mentioning; for a independent game company self publishing a board game, this is a quality product.  The company didn’t skimp on the materials.  All of the cards, game pieces, and the box itself are top notch quality, feel good in your hands, and lay flat on the table without curling at the edges or bending in the box.  That may seem like a comment more appropriate for an “unboxing” article, but given a recent complaint of a few major board games to come out that I’ve seen lately (bent tiles and such), I thought this was a nice touch in an independent company’s product that is worth mentioning.  The game also looks good, one of the first things that attracted me to the company’s table was the choice of colors for the various map pieces.  When laid out on the table in play, the entire thing looks both chaotic and pretty all at once.

The Board

Rules of the Zombieocalypse

As a brief synopsis of how game play works, the board is randomly generated each time in a pattern three tiles across, six tiles long.  The human’s goal is to escape by crossing from one end of the board to the other, and the zombies must stop them.  Intricate and quick systems have been worked out for generating zombie attacks and spawning, threat generation via a “noise” system, and other such details have been worked out and well honed to make play accessible and exciting.  In addition, humans and zombies both purchase or find cards which grant them equipment or events to dramatically alter the course of play.  The game is highly variable with hundreds upon hundreds of random characters, zombie types, and board combinations.  Zombies begin play with a set number of pawns placed across the board evenly, and then beginning spawning special zombies and using their special abilities to destroy the humans.  For more information on the rules, the entire guide is available online in PDF form from This is a Cow’s website, and can be accessed here.

Posthumous Z touts itself as the game for large group play by using teams of specialized and mundane zombies trying to destroy a unique team of randomly generated human survivors and supporting up to 10 players.  Nathan also really pushed the concept that the game would be a low downtime experience, requiring opposing players to strategize and plan while the enemy team takes their turn.  In play, I found this was not the case as much as I may have expected.  While certainly we used time during the enemy team’s turn to discuss our options and reveal what cards we might want to play to turn the battle, we found that there was really only one main strategy for the humans and one strategy for zombies, at least as best we could tell.  Humans should run, stay together, and move in a straight line to get to the end.  Zombies should stack up where they think the humans are going first, then spread out across the board from there to cover all deviations the human team may take.  In discussion with my group we struggled to find a good reason why humans should ever choose to stay back, split up, or move laterally across the board once beginning a path.  We found that time seemed to be against the humans and rushing to escape was the only choice to make.

A complete Human character

These concerns aside, the game is a blast to play.  There is something exciting about seeing all those zombies on the board, both from the perspective of someone stacking up a horde or the player facing seemingly insurmountable odds.  Combat favors humans early in the game, but as the zombies gather they can do some serious damage in large numbers.  There’s a definite feeling of needing to “win” the game early by starting on the right foot, with just enough randomness in dice rolls and point-purchase event and item cards that can turn the game in a losing team’s favor.

There was some concern at the table over the zombie Controller and human Spotlight mechanics.  Effectively, each team has a rotating leader that runs the turn for their respective team.  This had little effect on the human player’s turn, giving everyone a relatively high involvement in the team save for item searching.  For the zombies however, it seemed that a little too much importance was given to the Controller.  Particularly in a large team of zombies, it seemed that those who were not leading the turn had just too little to do.  Our group is considering a house rule to allow non-Controller players full control of their own zombies during the turn, including combat, and allowing the Controller to run his own and the gray zombies which do not belong to any individual player.  We think this would have been a good rule to implement just to keep everyone a bit more active.

Apocalyptic Final Thoughts

With so many zombie themed games on the market, Posthumous Z sets itself apart by being first and foremost a team play game.  It does similar things to what many other board games do in that it’s a bit gruesome, filled with comedy and movie references, and very fun to play.  What other games don’t do is handle large team play so well.  Though there is certainly room for improvement as mentioned above, a 5 on 5 game moves quick and you’d be hard pressed to find another game which can support that many players well.  It might be a hard sell at it’s current price to someone not looking for another undead themed game or doesn’t want to gather 9 other friends (though it can be played with smaller groups down to 1 on 1), but the price is a reflection not only on the quality of the game, but the fact that it is put out by an independent developer.  I’ve mentioned it before but I’ll repeat it here, this game is an absolute labor of love.  Nathan has hand made all of the art for the game, impressed everyone in the RavenCon game room by running his Posthumous Z table non-stop for the entirety of the weekend, and put together a great product.  There are some fantastic new ideas thrown into this board game and I’m eager to see what else comes out of This is a Cow in the future.  Nathan tease’s his next project Of Mice on his website, and I’m really looking forward to seeing what he can bring to a role playing game.  It’s unfortunate that the price of Posthumous Z may deter interested parties, but for those on the borderline of making that decision, it may help to consider it an investment in am awesome, friendly up and coming company.  I give the board game a full recommendation for fans of the genre looking to pack a table with corpses… err… uh… friends.

Special thanks to Josh and Danielle for the pictures!


About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

May 172011
 

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Roll vs Boredom article, my little experiment with  a new mechanic per adventure hasn’t gone as well as I’d hoped initially.  In truth, I think the requirement of coming up with a new mechanic and the subsequent implementation has been distracting rather than enhancing my game play.  As a result I’ve slowed down on the idea, but I am still working on new mechanics, many more subtle than what I think warrants a full article (I might do a compilation article some time in the future).  This article focuses on a mechanic I’ve been working on for a very different purpose but made good marriage with my current Savage Worlds fantasy campaign set in a rough translation of the D&D 3.5  Eberron Campaign Setting.  The mechanic is actually a subsystem, one I can’t reveal in full because I’ve designed it under contract with Gun Metal Games as an alternate rule set for the Interface Zero virtual reality world.  All that said, this isn’t about virtual reality, not in a fantasy game, this is about what my group’s barbarian calls the “spirit world,” a place where dreams are reality.

The Rules for Dreaming

Perhaps it was because I had just watched INCEPTION or just wanted to do something different, but my plans for introducing an alternate plane of existence based on dreams actually precedes my work on the virtual reality system.  I decided at the start of my campaign that my “big bad” would be Eberron’s Quori, supernaturally evil creatures that cannot materialize in the world of the living, but can infiltrate dreams to manipulate or terrify victims.  It was about the same time that I read about an interesting mechanic on Reddit, one which presented a rolling system that would favor extremes, highs or lows, but rarely middle ground results, it actually played a large part in inspiring this series of articles.  Read all about it here. While I loved this idea, when time came to bring it into my game it just didn’t work well with Savage Worlds, not just yet anyhow.  Savage Worlds just doesn’t have the highs and lows on the dice that other systems have, and a medium roll (since a 4 is typically a success) is just about as good as a high roll, raises not withstanding.  So I packed that idea away as something I might try to make use of later, perhaps in a d20 game where it can really shine, and instead started toying with other thoughts.

This is typically the part where I tell you what the new mechanic is and detail it out for use in your own games.  However, since I stole from myself for this one I can’t say much that would take away from the full version product coming out this Fall for the cyberpunk Interface Zero setting.  Instead, I’ll use this space to give you a little info about why I made what decisions I can tell you about.  A bit of insight into how I go about creating something like this.  Certainly I didn’t have to come up with a mechanic at all, and I wouldn’t often recommend creating one for the sake of just having a new rule (though, as a creative exercise that can be fun).  I could have just run this as another plane of existence, let the characters keep their standard stats in the new and alien world and face off with extra-planar monsters, but this dream world was to be a big part of my campaign and needed something to really set it apart from normal play, something to make it feel strange and fantastical.

The Dreaming Dark

Taking a break from my campaign planning, seeing as how any play in the dream lands was still far off, I ran and reviewed the Interface Zero setting using the system for Hacking as it was in the book.  After my review, I had a good discussion with Gun Metal Games’ president David Jarvis, and he offered me a chance to write up an alternative play system for The Deep, the name of the virtual reality network in his game.  My ideas for the new system blended together perfectly with my needs for dimensions which exist only in the mind.  I developed an alternate world based not on just die rolls, but that could play to a character’s mental advantages (and weaknesses).  Much like that digital world, the physical body in a dream becomes almost meaningless.  Though it has its effects, running on the acuity of the mind and strength of a person’s soul were instantly more important.

Dream world adventures take place entirely in the collective consciousness of sleepers, but these aren’t just patterns of random thought.  The players in these stories are manifesting in this realm with full control, the ultimate lucid dream.  As such, I wanted to give them something more than they might have with their base character, a level of manipulation that exceeded their character norms.  The solution was once again to steal from myself.  In Interface Zero, the Hacking trait is arguably the most important game skill when dealing with virtual reality, in addition to that, players can take powers (in my system) which allow them to modify code into damaging, corrupt data or to open doors from one part of The Deep to another, among many other examples.  In the plane of dreams I gave my players the same opportunities.  Every character, even the illiterate barbarian archetype, had some level of power while traversing the shared sleeping consciousness, a fun way to break character from his normal slashing and killing if he so chose, as well as each character being granted 1 point in a new skill called Dreamshaping.  Players could then level their Dreamshaping skill as normal after this, using the Dreamshaping skill as the analog to Interface Zero’s Hacking skill, a versatile mental strength which can be used to control the subjective reality around a character.  Having a skill like this allows for a potential of adventures that are completely non-linear, players can constantly change up the game world if they are feeling creative.

The nightmare given shape, the QuoriNightmare Stories

For my adventures using this mechanic, the party is facing the psionic powers of the Quori, creatures which thrive on fear and terror.  While any mind can serve the purpose to feed a hungry Quori’s nightmare lust, I decided to take this to a place of depravity where weak minds could be easily manipulated for these alien entities.  But first, I wanted to lay some expectations out and give the group a more or less “fun” introduction to my rules, so I had them manifest inside the dream of an ally on a power trip…

One of the party members has attracted a strange follower, after beating the alpha male in a pack of Glide Monkeys (Fantasy Companion for Savage Worlds) one of the winged baboons began to follow him around, thinking of him as the alpha male.  It’s been a fun and mostly loyal companion, but once the group entered the plane of dreams through a magical device, the flying monkey perceived itself in it’s dream form, a powerful, giant alpha male of its species, with protectors of equal size.  The players found themselves inside the building they had just left, but overrun with jungle plants as if they were flung far into the future and the demi-human races had fallen.  It was only after they defeated their flying monkey companion could they leave his dreamscape jungle and advance to face their true enemy in a place where the Quori had gathered up a great deal of their fear based energy.  My players proceeded to an insane asylum infested by the monsters.

Using the magically subdued patient’s dreaming nightmares as inspiration, I had the Quori manifest things such as looming giant spiderwebs and piranha men from the nightmares of non-player characters who suffered arachnophobia and phagophobia (the fear of being eaten, among other interpretations), I also had a crushing and evil black cloud to represent a fear of darkness in a sinister and “physically” aggressive way.  It made for a fun gallery of horrors and an action packed version of something almost Lovecraftian.  The players moved past these threats and eventually made it to some Quori themselves (which they dispatched almost too easily) resisting all of the monster’s fear effects and squashing them outright, a proud victory for my group.

I did get to drop someone in a dream combat, and this was fun because I got to see how that mechanic would play out.  In Interface Zero, when someone falls in combat they are either ejected from virtual reality or if a biofeedback program was used it might actually damage and kill their real body.  I thought of emulating that in the dream world, but I wanted a way to make my players a bit more fearful than just when they know a particularly aggressive psychic attack was targeting them.  I decided that lethality would be determined by whether or not their damaged and broken spirit could navigate the dream lands back to their unconscious body.  During game play, I made the mistake of using the standard Savage Worlds Vigor rolls to stabilize, but I think in future play I’m going to modify this to a Spirit roll.  I’m also going to be writing a separate chart of mental traumas or loss of the “soul”, resulting in permanent comatose, this would replace the injury and death chart for normal combat.  A critical failure would make the player character a shade of the dream world, doomed to haunt the nightmares of others forever trying to find their way home.  It’s something I need to detail more, and may end up in a future Roll vs Boredom article as a sequel to this one, since those are rules that do not feature in Interface Zero.

Waking Up

Overall I’d say the mechanic turned out to be a success, though I did learn that using these rules for fantasy as opposed to science fiction does yield very different results.  My Eberron players don’t seem to think of obstacles the same way, in my Interface Zero games The Deep is a potential solution to any problem, but so far (and it is certainly still early enough for this to change) my players see each trip to the dreamworld as a challenge to overcome.  They seem to enjoy it but want to get out, as if they are afraid that could get trapped and die there.  These dangers certainly are possibilities, but the heightened fear may just be good role playing since I’m running a party of mostly superstitious and primitive characters, they may just not want to anger the spirits they put so much stock in.

Once more, I’d like to thank my play testers for taking this bumpy road with me:  Thanks Beth, Chris, Jeff, Laura, and Rachael!

A Quori haunts an old man

[tags]GMing, RPG, role playing, games, game mechanics, Savage Worlds[/tags]

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

 Posted by on May 17, 2011
May 122011
 

Part 4 of my Interface Zero game run at this year’s RavenCon is now live, featuring the continuing adventures of a group of misfits on the run from corrupt Martian law forces in the year 2088…

This final segment brings the end of the Interface Zero adventure.  The team has learned who their enemy is, found evidence to shut them down, and now just needs to get that information out to save their own skins.

I want to thank everyone who has taken the time to listen to this, as it was my first “Actual Play” recording and I think it’s been a fun experiment.  I don’t know that I’ll do many more of these personally (though you can be sure Troll ITC will have plenty more to come).  I’m still learning what forms of media I like and what I don’t, but I want to get your feedback as well.  So please, if you have a moment, leave a comment and let me know what you thought of this whole thing.  Good community feedback is how a blog like ours lives and dies, so I want to hear anything you might have to say about this trial in gaming audio.

I can only hope you got at least some of the enjoyment out of listening as those of us who were present at the game did, I know I had a blast!

If you haven’t already listened to parts 1, 2, or 3 of this game session you can do so by clicking here and here and here.

As always, this podcast is available right here and on iTunes.

Note:  At the time this podcast was created I referenced a contract with Gun Metal Games for publishing alternate hacking rules for Interface Zero.  Due to a number of factors, that supplement was never/will never be published.  I’m being consulted currently to work on a different supplement for The Deep, but the rules set used in this adventure did not make the final cut.

Interface Zero Logo

[tags]RavenCon, RPG, Role Playing Games, Savage Worlds, Interface Zero, Actual Play,podcast[/tags]

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

May 102011
 

Part 3 of my Interface Zero game run at this year’s RavenCon is now live, featuring the continuing adventures of a group of misfits on the run from corrupt Martian law forces in the year 2088…

In this segment, we finally hit The Deep, the portion of the game I rewrote featuring a new system based on mental attributes and skills in the virtual world.

If you haven’t already listened to parts 1 or 2 of this game session you can do so by clicking here and here.

As always, this podcast is available right here and on iTunes.

Note:  At the time this podcast was created I referenced a contract with Gun Metal Games for publishing alternate hacking rules for Interface Zero.  Due to a number of factors, that supplement was never/will never be published.  I’m being consulted currently to work on a different supplement for The Deep, but the rules set used in this adventure did not make the final cut.

Interface Zero Logo

[tags]RavenCon, RPG, Role Playing Games, Savage Worlds, Interface Zero, Actual Play,podcast[/tags]

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

May 092011
 

A personal friend, mentor, and gaming buddy (as well as regular commenter here on Troll ITC as The Game Hermit) has just completed his first blog post over on his website, Unboxing the D&D Basic Set!

Head over to his site and check it out by clicking HERE, it’s a great read for new gamers and grognards alike.

[tags]rpg, D&D, unboxing, role playing, gaming[/tags]

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.

May 052011
 

Part 2 of my Interface Zero game run at this year’s RavenCon is now live, featuring the continuing adventures of a group of misfits on the run from corrupt Martian law forces in the year 2088…

If you haven’t already listened to Part 1 of this game session you can do so by clicking here.

As always, this podcast is available right here and on iTunes.

Note:  At the time this podcast was created I referenced a contract with Gun Metal Games for publishing alternate hacking rules for Interface Zero.  Due to a number of factors, that supplement was never/will never be published.  I’m being consulted currently to work on a different supplement for The Deep, but the rules set used in this adventure did not make the final cut.

Interface Zero Logo

[tags]RavenCon, RPG, Role Playing Games, Savage Worlds, Interface Zero, Actual Play,podcast[/tags]

About Nick Nundahl

I'm a wild haired demi-viking living on the East Coast United States. I've run games in countless systems and tanked more game nights than I've ever run successfully, but hopefully I learned a lot in the process and I'd like to pass that on. Follow me on Twitter.