Dec 142010
 

As promised, I’m writing again to give you guys an update on my ongoing Pathfinder Freeport game. The first session was a big departure from your usual Pathfinder game in that we didn’t really use Pathfinder at all. The second session proceeded in a much more normal fashion.

The second session picked up with the group just having docked in Freeport. I wanted to get them established in the city, so I had the mysterious force that led them through their visions in the first session plant one piece of a four-part map on each of them. As well, I wanted each of them to be able to begin to explore their own individual plotlines. This was the first session that we were using their real character stats as well, so I knew it might take a little bit to get them eased into things.

The group proceeded into the city and got directions to a place to stay for the night in the richest part of the city. They didn’t consider that they looked like near-drowned rats and that their passage was marked by more than a few eyes in the city. That’s going to make things interesting as the sessions go on.

That night, they each had to deal with visions of some kind. All of them were designed to give them some kind of indications as to what they should be doing in the city. This may seem heavy-handed but I’ll explain my motivations once I finish with this recap.

After they woke, they decided to compare notes and they managed to assemble the four-part map. The map led through the Merchant District (where they were staying for the night) to a rundown house on the edge of the Merchant District. On the gate to the house was a set of symbols that all seemed to align with the characters. They all touched the gate, it opened and the went to the house. I called the session as they opened the door.

All in all, it was a pretty good, if short session. I admit, I was a bit heavy-handed with some of the items during the session. My players don’t have the easiest time remembering what has gone on from one session to the next and if they seem to be floundering, I’ll slap down some railroad tracks and do my best to get them going. It’s especially bad when there has been a lot of time in between sessions. The good part is that once I get them on the right track, they usually take the plot and run with it; it just takes a bit to get started sometimes.

The only thing that I’m a little worried about is how I portrayed the Merchant District to the players. The Merchant District is described as being very posh and very well-protected. I gave them no indication that their dirty appearance might make them unwelcome, and I also (as you will see in the third session) basically gave them a house on the edge of the District. As we continue to play, I need to do a better job of distinguishing between the Districts and give them a feel for what the Merchant District is really like.

I should have my info about the third session up soon. In the meantime, have a listen to the audio of the second session.

[tags]rpg, rpgs, Freeport, Pathfinder, Winds of Change[/tags]

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About Tracy

I love games, and I love to write about games. Hopefully when I write about games, you'll find something to like. I actively play Pathfinder and Savage Worlds, but am always willing to give something new a try. Follow me on Twitter, and check out my openly developed campaign setting for Pathfinder, Savage World, and Fate: Sand & Steam.

  One Response to “Freeport: Winds of Change – Session 2”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by RPG Bloggers Network, Tracy. Tracy said: New Post: Winds of Change Session 2 – http://trollitc.com/2010/12/freeport-winds-of-change-session-2/ | Troll in the Corner [...]

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