Nov 042010
 

If you follow me on Twitter, then you’ve likely see my updates on the campaign that I started this past Friday. After reading Ben’s post on the Pathfinder Freeport Companion, I got really intrigued. I contacted some folks at Green Ronin and got hold of a copy of The Pirate’s Guide to Freeport, which I am using to run my game. I’ll be giving you all regular status updates about the game and posting session recaps, as well as game audio. I don’t have the audio uploaded to The Gamer’s Haven just yet so I’ll make sure to put up a post when I get that done.

A Fresh Wind

It has been a few months since I’ve run a game with my group. With all of the conventions that I went to this summer and life in general getting in the way, it’s no surprise that it has taken me a while to get something going. The Freeport setting was interesting to me from the jump. I had heard about it over the years but I was trapped in my OFFICIAL PRODUCTS ONLY RAWR! phase, so I never gave it any attention.

The Pirate’s Guide to Freeport has got to be one of the best supplements that I have ever come across when it comes to giving a GM what they need to run a game in the setting. The city is detailed with loving precision and there are more plot hooks than you can shake a stick at. No matter what kind of game you’re looking for, Freeport can probably  be the place in which it happens.

In terms of how I wanted to set this game up, my biggest focus was to make sure that the characters are the center of the proceedings, rather than my story. Before I started recording my sessions, I had run a set of really good sessions set in a 3rd Edition adaptation of Ross Peyton’s excellent New World setting. Much like Freeport, the New World setting is chock full of interesting NPCs and plot hooks. The players had an agenda that they were looking to execute and they got to interact with the world in ways that seemed real and satisfying. As well, I made sure that they didn’t feel like their actions were happening inside of a vacuum. I wanted them to know that their actions has consequences and that they should do the things they do because their characters wanted to advance their goals, not because the GM had set a plot hook down in front of them.

Turning Tides

We had our first session last week. it went really well and I’m looking forward to sharing all of the details with you, which I will do once I have the audio posted. In the meantime, for all of you GMs out there, keep in mind that the characters are the focus of your game. The best RPG experiences I have ever had have come when character plots are fully realized and the game is more than a vehicle for the GM to tell a specific story. Now all that remains to be seen is if I can live up to my own expectations.

Expect the audio to be posted soon, along with the details of the first session.

[tags]rpg, rpgs, Freeport, campaigns, Winds of Change, role playing games, Pathfinder[/tags]

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About Tracy

I love games, and I love to write about games. Hopefully when I write about games, you'll find something to like. I actively play Pathfinder and Savage Worlds, but am always willing to give something new a try. Follow me on Twitter, and check out my openly developed campaign setting for Pathfinder, Savage World, and Fate: Sand & Steam.

  2 Responses to “Freeport: Winds of Change – Prelude”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Troll in the Corner and RPG Bloggers Network, Tracy. Tracy said: Freeport: Winds of CHange – Prelude http://bit.ly/bjfqCC | Troll in the Corner [...]

  2. [...] I mentioned in my Prelude post, that we had our first session of Winds of Change recently and I think it went pretty well. When I [...]

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