May 242010
 

Image by: blmurch

This link will take you to the audio for the session. If you would like to see all of my posts about this campaign, find them here.

This session was both really, really good, and really, really long. In fact, it’s what inspired my post about running a marathon session. We started at around 2:30 in the afternoon and, with some breaks along the way, ended up gaming until a little after midnight.

The good of this session came from just how bloody much we were able to get accomplished. We’re scheduled to not be able to play this campaign for a little over a month, as I have to get ready for KantCon, so I wanted to get as much done as we could to make sure that things left off on a good note.

The biggest part of this session was the party dealing with the Insane Survivors that were left around the city. I had thought that I might go with that idea when I was writing my post on the second session, and the more I thought about it, the better I liked the idea. I designed the survivors to be creepy, a little deadly and above all, interesting. They were made up of a crazy merchant, a zombie- and other stuff-hunting innkeeper, the group’s own commanding officer, a pair of nobles who were a little out of touch with reality, and the proprietress of a somewhat (eewwww) still-functioning whorehouse. The whole thing capped off with a fight against a zombified minotaur and, ultimately, a frenzied flight from the city.

There were a few things that happened in this session that I am particularly proud of.

Keeping the party on the hook the whole time.

This is something that can be a problem in a long session like this one. I think I did a decent job of pacing things and giving them a mix of things they had to do (commanding officer’s order, etc), and things they felt they had to do. Above all, though, I think taking the breaks that we did helped more than anything. We got all of our out-of-game stuff taken care of out of game, and were able to focus when we were playing. Good stuff.

The insane survivors

These guys were just too fun to play. I ended up forgetting some of the abilities that they had as we played, but I was still able to give my players some interesting conversation, and some interesting situations to deal with. It’s not something that I’ll necessarily be able to do again in this game, so I’m glad that I got it right the first time.

The Feather Token

At some point in time, the party killed someone I wasn’t expecting them to kill. It’s one of the perils of making things up on the fly, but in this case, it worked out perfectly. Without even thinking about it, I gave them a Feather Token (Bird) as a piece of treasure. I didn’t give the item a lot of thought, and I hadn’t given a lot of thought to how I was going to wrap up the session. I figured they’d fight the minotaur and eventually decide to leave; maybe in a few sessions.

They decided to use the token to try and contact their High Priest of Tempus, who was out of the city when the attack happened. It. Was. Perfect. Just like that, I had an easy way to get them to leave the city and to advance the plot. Add to that a 4th Edition-style Skill Challenge to have them leave the city in a cinematic fashion, and I feel it’s safe to say that the Feather Token was the pivot upon which the entire story turned.

It’s a shame that we’re not going to be able to play this game for a while, but that’s life. Until then, and as always, your comments and feedback are more than welcome.

[tags]All That Remains, rpg, rpgs, tabletop, GMing[/tags]

About Tracy

I love games, and I love to write about games. Hopefully when I write about games, you'll find something to like. I actively play Pathfinder and Savage Worlds, but am always willing to give something new a try. Follow me on Twitter, and check out my openly developed campaign setting for Pathfinder, Savage World, and Fate: Sand & Steam.

  4 Responses to “All That Remains – Session 3”

  1. The girl in that photo must love blueberries …

  2. All zombies love blueberries. Didn’t you know that? =)

  3. Then I did my job well. Thanks!

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