Apr 202010
 

Maybe it was happenstance, maybe it was fate. I begin writing for a gaming blog, and the creator of said blog has a thing for zombies. Shortly following that, the characters in my campaign die, leaving unfinished their quest to rid their homeworld of an undead threat. And then, when I ask them what kind of campaign they would like to play next, their answer?

Zombie Apocalypse.

So I did what any good GM would do: I found a way to infest the world with zombies. The original undead problem has been caused by Atropus, one of the Elder Evils found in the WotC book of the same name. Usually these Elder Evils will just destroy the world when they’re not stopped, but I figured there was no fun in that, so I changed Atropus’ nature to have it start a zombie apocalypse. I also wanted to make sure that my players really felt like they were in a zombie movie, so I added a few houserules to help with that. As an aside, we’re playing in the Pathfinder rules (slow leveling track), and the campaign setting is The Forgotten Realms.

Improvised Weapons
In every zombie movie of note, as resources run out, the characters have to improvise. In Pathfinder and D&D, using an improvised weapon adds a -4 penalty. To keep the spirit of the zombie genera alive (undead), I eliminated that penalty, and generally assigned damage to an item based on its size relative to a similar, actual weapon.

Headshots
Everybody knows that to put down a zombie, you take its head. So here’s where the -4 penalty comes back in. Want to aim for the head? No problem, but you take a -4 to the attack. Any hit to a zombie’s head (unless stated otherwise) is considered to be a critical hit which uses the wielded weapon’s usual crit modifier, x2 in the case of the improvisied weapons mentioned above.

Kill of the Moment
If you’ve seen Zombieland, you know that they rank their kills. If someone kills a zombie, or group of zombies in a particularly creative/gruesome way, then they’ll be awarded some bonus XP for it.

Other Alternate Rules
As I’ve listened to other groups’ gaming sessions and heard the houserules they use, I’ve adopted some of them for my own games.

    * Bennies – Players start each session with two Bennies to let them re-roll any roll.* Fuck You, I’m Awesome – Players start each session with one Fuck You, I’m Awesome token, which will let them turn any one failed roll into an instant success.

    * Banking – Players may bank a number of the above tokens equal to their level.

    * Critical XP – Players gain 100XP for each Critical Hit, and 50XP for each Critical Failure.

    * Crit Hit/Crit Fumble Tables – Players and Enemies have the option of choosing normal weapon Critical multiplier, or taking normal damage and rolling on the Citical Hit table when not fighting a zombie. Players can roll to see results before choosing. A Critical Fumble table will be used for all Critical Misses.

I know that there are probably better systems to use for a zombie game, and I know that I’ll have to play fast-and-loose with the rules at times to make it interesting, but we had our first session this past weekend, and we had a blast. I recorded the audio of the sessions and posted it to The Gamer’s Haven. As soon as it gets posted, I’ll post a recap of the first session and link you all to the audio. Feedback is appreciated.

[tags]rpg, campaign, zombies, gaming, All That Remains[/tags]

About Tracy

I love games, and I love to write about games. Hopefully when I write about games, you'll find something to like. I actively play Pathfinder and Savage Worlds, but am always willing to give something new a try. Follow me on Twitter, and check out my openly developed campaign setting for Pathfinder, Savage World, and Fate: Sand & Steam.

  4 Responses to “All That Remains – A New Zombie Campaign”

  1. Interesting rules, that sounds like a fun campaign. For future zombie killing fun, I highly recommend All Flesh Must Be Eaten from Eden Studios. The system (Unisystem) is fantastic, managing to at the same time make characters feel very real while being simple and rules-lite, and the core source/rulebook contains stats for any sort of weapon you can imagine, as well as ideas for many settings, both modern and historical. The one thing Unisystem doesn’t handle well is high fantasy, but in a zombie campaign that’s usually preferable, and it does have an interesting magic mechanic.

  2. Hey! Keep your hands offa my zom. . . oh . . . wait that does sound cool!

    Seriously – I welcome the zombie apocalypses (apocalii?). The more the better in my book. I like the rules you’ve introduced as well. As luck would have it – I’m rethinking my zombies and hope to publish the revised zombie stats (a la Pathfinder) today along with . . . a cure?

    It’s gonna be an undead kinda day.

  3. Ben,

    That’s excellent news for me. I kind of winged it when it came to the stats of my zombies in the first session, so having something more concrete will be excellent. Glad to help synergize our posts today. =)

  4. […] promised in my first post about this game, this is my recap of the first session of my new zombie campaign: All That […]

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